“Redemption” (George Herbert)

“Redemption” by George Herbert, paraphrased by Art Eschenlauer

As long-time tenant to a wealthy Lord,
not thriving, I resolvèd to be bold
and make suit to the Owner to afford
a new, reduced-rent lease, and cancel th’old.

At Heaven’s manor, thus, my Lord I sought:
They told me that my Lord was lately gone
about some land on Earth, so dearly bought
quite long ago, to take possession.

Returning, knowing of my Lord’s great birth,
I searched accordingly in great resorts;
in cities, theaters, gardens, parks, and courts:

At length, I heard a ragged noise and mirth
of thieves and murd’rers: there my Lord I spied,
who said, “Your suit is granted,” and then died.


I paraphrased George Herbert’s poem “Redemption” (published in 1633 in The Temple; see e.g. https://tinyurl.com/GeorgeHerbertRedemption) because I wanted more modern language (more gender-neutral and less confusing), but I wanted to try to preserve the “feel” and meaning as best I could.

License: CC BY-SA 4.0